Green Zone Painting

By Marion Jones
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painting - 2014 - 80 x 80 cms

The composition is largely determined or developed from the wooden struts/stretcher pieces of the canvas and the zones formed between these. Drips, different effects, colour, materials and procedures become the main structuring agents as the painting develops. This is the first painting in the Zone series where the compositions are largely organic and somewhat unpredictable but all relate in some way to the canvas structure.

Discussion

John Brennan
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I love the colour palette in this painting, inadvertently it's reminiscent of a landscape seen from above. I'm always intrigued by abstract work in terms of the deciding factor as to what marks go where and why and I'm sure for every artist it's different. Do you tap into subliminal urges when making marks, or is the painting constructed in a more calculated way to achieve a conscious intention?

Marion Jones
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Thanks for your comments. I usually approach a painting with an intention in mind. I think about the initial structure of the composition which in this case relates to the canvas supports. Then using a different process or colour I create, delete and distort layers. I don't know how it is going to turn out and spend along time looking at the paintings. Problem solving in a way.

www.marionjones.co.uk

John Brennan
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Have you always been abstract, was there a figurative starting point at some time in the past? I'm always interested in this. My work's so swamped in cultural influences it would never occur to me to move to abstraction.

Marion Jones
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My concerns have mostly been non figurative. I can't really understand why there is such a massive divide between so called abstract and figurative art. Most of the concerns are the same, composition, colour, line etc.

John Brennan
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A lengthy reply but I believe in this stuff...

The following is just my opinion of course and it's worth saying that the line between figurative and abstract can be very blurred at times.

They are the same, but only at the surface level. At that level figurative painting is indeed abstract, it's just that the abstract elements have been arranged such as to produce a representation of reality.

Beyond that level they're very different.

When it comes to conveying the artist's concept and intent, figurative painting directs the process by use of recognisable elements. Ie. A shoe will always be a shoe, it can't be misinterpreted as a bird or a plane. That's not to say that figurative art isn't open to misinterpretation of course, that's down to talent of the artist in conveying the intent.

Abstract painting can never make direct statements in this way because it's content is abstract and is always open to wide interpretation.

There are also whole swathes of cultural references and sheer baggage that come part and parcel with images of the real world, whereas the references in abstract painting can only ever be partial references to the real world or else references to earlier abstract painting.

I'd liken it to the difference between instrumental music and songs. Songs are direct because they have words.

Neither is greater than the other but they are most definitely different.

Marion Jones
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I think that the difference is far less marked or 'surface' than you suggest. I look at figurative paintings in the same way as I look at so called abstract paintings. I might look at a head or shape and relate this to my cultural baggage, my knowledge of art history or my understanding of form or line. All paintings are open to interpretation and rely on these references, they are not just abstract or figurative. It is maybe the term abstract that creates problems, maybe all paintings are abstract.

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Edges, planes, layers and tensions between 2 and 3 dimensions. Geometry and process.
Transparent and opaque layers, solid and floating forms, matte and shiny surfaces and colours. As the light changes or the viewer changes their gaze, forms become visible or disappear.
These are process- driven paintings where systems and geometric shapes, forms and colours are distorted and changed as the painting emerges. The compositions are largely intuitive and somewhat unpredictable but all relate in some way to the canvas structure or edge of the paper or canvas.

Raoul De Keyser, Malevitch, Guston, Ryman, David Reed, Prunella Clough, Duccio, Mary Heilmann, Noel Forster, Hoyland , Jean Spencer ....

Artist Statement

Edges, planes, layers and tensions between 2 and 3 dimensions. Geometry and process.
Transparent and opaque layers, solid and floating forms, matte and shiny surfaces and colours. As the light changes or the viewer changes their gaze, forms become visible or disappear.
These are process- driven paintings where systems and geometric shapes, forms and colours are distorted and changed as the painting emerges. The compositions are largely intuitive and somewhat unpredictable but all relate in some way to the canvas structure or edge of the paper or canvas.

Raoul De Keyser, Malevitch, Guston, Ryman, David Reed, Prunella Clough, Duccio, Mary Heilmann, Noel Forster, Hoyland , Jean Spencer ....

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