Daniel Leng

Photographer | Seattle, WA, United States
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Artist Statement

I have always loved photographs. But, until my early twenties, I had a dislike for cameras. I resented them. I viewed the process of taking a photo as an unjustifiable disruption to an otherwise perfect moment. I simply could not comprehend why anyone would put the fragments of life that they enjoyed the most on pause to take out a camera.

In 2000, my mom gave me her Canon AE-1 from the 70s. It wasn’t elegant. It was old and needed repairs. But I found myself drawn to the simplicity of its system – compose an image, focus, set aperture, set shutter speed, click. What I started to realize is that using cameras could actually help me to see in new ways. Experiencing the moments of life through a rangefinder, twin-lens reflex camera, or large format camera is profoundly different from the naked eye. Experiencing those same moments under the enlarger in the darkroom, emerging from a chemical bath as a print, and again etched in silver halide on paper also provides an altered perspective.

I’ve come to love different photographic processes for their unique qualities, both in practice and result. Each one helps me to more intimately explore the captured moment. I aim to match the photographic process to the desired expression of the moment.

Overall, I have come to think of the photographic process as a conversation. An internal dialogue that starts when I look through the viewfinder and continues through the process of making a physical object out of that captured moment. I find myself adding to the conversation long after the final image is complete – adding new perspective to the dialogue that began with an original, fleeting moment. I’m still bad at pausing life’s memories (just ask my wife who wonders where all the family vacation photos are), but, for me, the moments I do capture on film become more profound, more dynamic, and more enjoyable.

I have always created my images for me. But I’ve come to realize that sharing my work with others can enhance it and what I learn from it. My hope is that those who view my work can learn something about themselves or the world around them and, ultimately, can add to the conversation that I have only just begun.

Recent Work

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    The Beginning 0
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    Favorite Place 0
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Recent Series

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    The Shape of Us 0

About Daniel Leng

Dan Leng graduated with a Bachelors Degree in Art History and Computer Science from Duke University in 2000. Dan worked for 13 years in the tech industry, the last 10 at Amazon.com, before deciding to venture out on his own to combine his passion for fine art with technology. Dan founded Point and Line in 2013.

Dan currently lives and works in Seattle, Washington. He is an ongoing student of photography and community member at Photographic Center Northwest. He has produced one major photographic series to date entitled “Being Thai,” which showed in a solo exhibition at Globe Gallery, Seattle in 2009.

Website danleng.com
Linkedin //in/danleng

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Artist Statement

I have always loved photographs. But, until my early twenties, I had a dislike for cameras. I resented them. I viewed the process of taking a photo as an unjustifiable disruption to an otherwise perfect moment. I simply could not comprehend why anyone would put the fragments of life that they enjoyed the most on pause to take out a camera.

In 2000, my mom gave me her Canon AE-1 from the 70s. It wasn’t elegant. It was old and needed repairs. But I found myself drawn to the simplicity of its system – compose an image, focus, set aperture, set shutter speed, click. What I started to realize is that using cameras could actually help me to see in new ways. Experiencing the moments of life through a rangefinder, twin-lens reflex camera, or large format camera is profoundly different from the naked eye. Experiencing those same moments under the enlarger in the darkroom, emerging from a chemical bath as a print, and again etched in silver halide on paper also provides an altered perspective.

I’ve come to love different photographic processes for their unique qualities, both in practice and result. Each one helps me to more intimately explore the captured moment. I aim to match the photographic process to the desired expression of the moment.

Overall, I have come to think of the photographic process as a conversation. An internal dialogue that starts when I look through the viewfinder and continues through the process of making a physical object out of that captured moment. I find myself adding to the conversation long after the final image is complete – adding new perspective to the dialogue that began with an original, fleeting moment. I’m still bad at pausing life’s memories (just ask my wife who wonders where all the family vacation photos are), but, for me, the moments I do capture on film become more profound, more dynamic, and more enjoyable.

I have always created my images for me. But I’ve come to realize that sharing my work with others can enhance it and what I learn from it. My hope is that those who view my work can learn something about themselves or the world around them and, ultimately, can add to the conversation that I have only just begun.

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About Daniel Leng

Dan Leng graduated with a Bachelors Degree in Art History and Computer Science from Duke University in 2000. Dan worked for 13 years in the tech industry, the last 10 at Amazon.com, before deciding to venture out on his own to combine his passion for fine art with technology. Dan founded Point and Line in 2013.

Dan currently lives and works in Seattle, Washington. He is an ongoing student of photography and community member at Photographic Center Northwest. He has produced one major photographic series to date entitled “Being Thai,” which showed in a solo exhibition at Globe Gallery, Seattle in 2009.

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